News + Announcements

Low THC levels not linked to increased risk of car crashes

Post Date: Jun 13, 2019

Canadian drug-impaired driving laws penalize drivers found to have blood THC levels of between two to five nanograms per millilitre. However, new research led by the University of British Columbia suggests that THC levels less than five nanograms/ml of blood do not lead to an increased risk of causing car crashes in most drivers.

The findings, published in the journal Addiction, adds to a growing body of research into the road safety impacts of not only THC, but a variety of legal and illegal substances, suggesting more research is needed to inform drug-impaired driving laws.

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UBC launches Canada’s first graduate blockchain training path

Post Date: Jun 11, 2019

The University of British Columbia (UBC) is launching Canada’s first blockchain and distributed ledger technology training path for graduate students. The initiative aims to build capacity for existing master’s and PhD students in this area and help scale Canada’s blockchain industry, while also tackling some of the world’s most complex sociotechnical issues.

Set to become the world’s most multidisciplinary blockchain training path, the unique initiative will provide students with next-generation tools and applications to address issues in FinTech, engineering and computer science, and information governance through its disciplinary streams.

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Mothers of colour experience high rates of mistreatment by providers during childbirth in the U.S.

Post Date: Jun 11, 2019

Mothers of colour experience less respect and autonomy and more mistreatment than white women during childbirth, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

In a study published today in Reproductive Health, community members worked with researchers to survey 2,700 women across the United States on their experience of care during childbirth. While 17 per cent of all women reported experiencing one or more types of mistreatment, incidents of mistreatment were higher for women of colour.

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Scientists edge closer to root causes of multiple sclerosis

Post Date: Jun 11, 2019

An international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia has made a scientific advance they hope will lead to the development of preventative treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS).

In a study published today in PLOS Genetics, researchers found mutations in 12 genes believed to be largely responsible for the onset of MS in families with multiple members diagnosed with the disease.

“These genes are like a lighthouse illuminating where the root cause of MS is,” said lead author Carles Vilariño-Güell, assistant professor in the UBC faculty of medicine’s department of medical genetics and a Michael Smith Scholar.

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Research group launches probe into allegation of racial profiling of black student

Post Date: Jun 06, 2019

Media reported on an incident involving allegations of racial profiling at an academic conference at UBC put on by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

The story appeared on Global BC, CBC and Daily Hive.

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UBC researchers find ways to hackproof smart meters

Post Date: Jun 10, 2019

Smart electricity meters are useful because they allow energy utilities to efficiently track energy use and allocate energy production. But because they’re connected to a grid, they can also serve as back doors for malicious hackers. In this Q&A, cybersecurity researcher Karthik Pattabiraman, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at UBC, talks about his recent breakthrough aimed at improving the security of these devices and boosting security in the smart grid.

Karthik Pattabiraman

Why is it so important to secure smart meters?

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Home exercise program reduces rate of falling in at-risk seniors

Post Date: Jun 10, 2019

An in-home exercise program reduced subsequent falls in high-risk seniors by 36 per cent, according the results of a 12-month clinical trial published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study, conducted by UBC faculty of medicine researchers in partnership with the clinical team at the Falls Prevention Clinic at Vancouver General Hospital, found a reduction in fall rate and a small improvement in cognitive function in seniors who received strength and balance training through the clinical trial.

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