News + Announcements

Atmospheric pressure impacts greenhouse gas emissions from leaky oil and gas wells: UBC study

Post Date: Oct 18, 2019

Fluctuations in atmospheric pressure can heavily influence how much natural gas leaks from wells below the ground surface at oil and gas sites, according to new University of British Columbia research. However, current monitoring strategies do not take this phenomenon into account, and therefore may be under- or over-estimating the true magnitude of gas emissions.

The unintentional leakage of natural gas from oil and gas wells into the surrounding subsurface – known as fugitive gas migration – is a major environmental concern that can lead to groundwater contamination and the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

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New international exercise guidelines for cancer survivors

Post Date: Oct 16, 2019

For the rising number of cancer survivors worldwide, there’s growing evidence that exercise is an important part of recovery. But how much, and what type of exercise, is needed?

A recent review of research, conducted by an international group of experts led by the University of British Columbia, has resulted in the development of new exercise guidelines for cancer survivors.

The updated recommendations, published today in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, outline specific ‘exercise prescriptions’ to address common side effects, such as anxiety and fatigue, associated with cancer diagnoses and treatment.

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UBC lab spins nanofibre ‘gold’ from waste fabrics

Post Date: Oct 18, 2019

Fast fashion generates huge amounts of textile waste, but researchers have developed a way to recycle some of that fabric into useful products

In the materials engineering labs at UBC, surrounded by Bunsen burners, microscopes and spinning machines, professor Frank Ko and research scientist Addie Bahi have developed a simple process for converting waste cotton into much higher-value nanofibres.

These fibres are the building blocks of advanced products like surgical implants, antibacterial wound dressings and fuel cell batteries.

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UBC student becomes inventor to help brother with muscular dystrophy

Post Date: Oct 16, 2019

Watching his older brother Daniel struggle with Duchenne muscular dystrophy—a disease that progressively weakens the muscles and eventually leaves the individual unable to walk—is one of the hardest things UBC student Michael Ko has ever had to do in his life.

In response, Michael, currently in his fourth year in UBC’s engineering physics program, turned to technology and his knack for invention to help his brother do simple tasks and find a measure of enjoyment in life.

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What can we do to stop climate change? Experts share their views

Post Date: Oct 10, 2019

Youth climate activists around the world are planning a Global Climate Strike during the week of Sept. 20-27 to demand action on the climate crisis. Millions of people could join the protest. Ahead of the strike date, we asked several UBC experts who work in climate-related fields for their views on what we can do to stop climate change.

If you were to recommend one policy action to help stop climate change, what would it be?

Juan Jose Alava studies and conducts modelling to understand the interactions of climate change and pollutants in marine ecosystems and food webs.

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UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking

Post Date: Oct 16, 2019

Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. The findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, suggest people with gambling disorder – a psychiatric term for serious gambling problems – may have pre-existing genetic vulnerabilities to the illness.

This study is the first to investigate vulnerabilities to gambling disorder by looking at siblings. The disorder, which is associated with severe negative consequences including depression, bankruptcy and family breakup, affects up to three per cent of the Canadian population.

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How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travellers

Post Date: Oct 09, 2019

Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business has found.

How those fees are presented at the time of ticket purchase is the key to consumer acceptance. People respond better when the fee is labeled as a carbon offset rather than a tax. And they respond better if they know the producers and importers of airplane fuel have been billed for it—not just themselves.

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